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Author Topic: Basics of Composition  (Read 7075 times)

Offline sehgalatul

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Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #15 on: April 26, 2014, 11:32:45 PM »
Ok Guys Lets me present my views on this...whatever Ayaz was saying is correct but technically partly correct...I use Depth of field in my pictures...Not that i shoot at f/16 and that way all the picture appears sharp...I employ what you all named hyperfocal distance. I know many of you have read about it and know that technically. I also understand many of you wont be carrying measuring tapes with you for focusing on hyperfocal distance. So How exactly do you focus on the hyperfocal distance...Thats what my question is to all,  using your Camera...and without a measuring tape . Let me see what Methods some of our Colleagues employ...It will become interactive and We all will mutually benefit from each other.  ;)

Offline Sandeep

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Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #16 on: April 27, 2014, 09:49:59 AM »
Ok Guys Lets me present my views on this...whatever Ayaz was saying is correct but technically partly correct...I use Depth of field in my pictures...Not that i shoot at f/16 and that way all the picture appears sharp...I employ what you all named hyperfocal distance. I know many of you have read about it and know that technically. I also understand many of you wont be carrying measuring tapes with you for focusing on hyperfocal distance. So How exactly do you focus on the hyperfocal distance...Thats what my question is to all,  using your Camera...and without a measuring tape . Let me see what Methods some of our Colleagues employ...It will become interactive and We all will mutually benefit from each other.  ;)

I use the distance scale on my uwa lens and focus just behind my foreground object. While for kit lens I autofocus to 1/3 rd of the scene approximately.  Initially it's trial and error,  hit and miss.,  but after couple of years I know what distance to focus for a particular scene. Still learning though.

What is your approach?
« Last Edit: April 27, 2014, 09:54:21 AM by Sandeep »
"There is nothing worse than a sharp image of a fuzzy concept." - Ansel Adams

Offline theqca

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Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #17 on: April 27, 2014, 11:41:17 AM »
Im not really into calculations / numbers to be very honest and shoot without thinking about them so im not a very technical sort of a photographer.

Would however be keen on knowing details on the technique you've mentioned...do share them here...
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Offline sehgalatul

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Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #18 on: April 27, 2014, 10:06:57 PM »
 Good Evening Guys....I was expecting this answer of focusing into 1/3 rd of the scene from someone and one friend did post this...Great he is Right thats the most common cheat code what everyone would direct you to employ....But my question persists how do you find whats the 1/3rd the distance is in Camera...Fellows wide angle lenses have great depth of field that is their intrinsic property but than once you would learn how to employ DOF you guys would be amazed by the size and sharpness you would achieve in a big sized print...?

So many members would be reading this but not participating.....Guys try...I promise to reveal the secret very soon. Earlier lens were having DOF scales and they allowed you to use hyperfocal distance..LARGE FORMAT LENSES still have these features. Current lenses dont have these markings so the technique is must....

Offline Sandeep

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Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #19 on: April 28, 2014, 08:12:05 AM »
Hello Atul,
Good morning.. I approximate.

Will be awaiting to know your technique.. always good to know a better solution.
"There is nothing worse than a sharp image of a fuzzy concept." - Ansel Adams

Offline somnath goswami

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Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #20 on: April 28, 2014, 09:09:39 AM »
I approximate.

Will be awaiting to know your technique.. always good to know a better solution.
Same here :)

Offline Jasii

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Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #21 on: April 28, 2014, 10:50:40 AM »
@ Atul Sehgal: All eyes on you, it better be a good solution, else get ready for crucification doc!!  ;)
A Year young with my DSLR and loving it.........
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Offline somnath goswami

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Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #22 on: April 28, 2014, 11:14:28 AM »
@ Atul Sehgal: All eyes on you, it better be a good solution, else get ready for crucification doc!!  ;)
Easy man easy. No such pressure. Forum welcomes discussion on all topics related to photography, no holes barred :D.
Cheers
Somnath

Offline saiki

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Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #23 on: April 29, 2014, 12:58:37 PM »
Normally i take a  hint from the DOF calculator App, then guess,click and pray ;D..... eagerly waiting for ur solution....

N:B: Atulji you better reveal fast for your own good.... plz refer  ;D

@ Atul Sehgal: All eyes on you, it better be a good solution, else get ready for crucification doc!!  ;)
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Offline Hot Shoe

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Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #24 on: April 29, 2014, 02:27:38 PM »
I join the rest awaiting with bated breath !!   :D
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Offline kaushik_s

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Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #25 on: April 29, 2014, 04:41:57 PM »
I'm not sure if SehgalAtul is talking about this technique, but I'll still try to explain a simple technique that I've learned,
1. Set your desired aperture and compose your frame.
2. Focus at infinity
3. Press DOF preview button
4. Check the closest point in focus when DOF button is still pressed. Live view  and magnification helps a lot here.
5. That point you've found in step 4 is more or less your hyperfocal distance for that aperture. Now move the the focus to that point.
6. Take your pic :)

I've tried using this technique during film days and it used to be difficult to find the nearest point in focus in that darkened out viewfinder. So almost stopped using it because of that. But with Live view it's kind of easier now and it really helps. Although I've not yet tallied the result with the DOF chart but I think it works.

Regards,
Kaushik
Painting with Light and Shadow..
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Offline sehgalatul

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Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #26 on: April 29, 2014, 05:45:40 PM »
 Well guys!!!!!!  I know you have wiated long enough...Mr Kaushik followed  CORRECT APPROACH PARTLY... hERE IS how i do that. Ideally set the camera in aperture priority mode. Dial the aperture f11 or lower but not below f 16( diffraction sets in). Now frame the shot in the viewfinder......Now most important question where to focus....See guys you dont carry measuring tapes with you neither you have assistants who would measure that distance for you...Many a times you are at a point where there is a valley or you are on a cliff and you can go ahead. so now next part of the story is main point and one of my reason why i shifted to nikon from Canon....now please dont start this age old debate what system is better. In all Nikon s there is a viewfinder with a grid system. when you are shooting horizontally than you see in the viewfinder there are three lines in grid top , middle and lowest running horizontally and there are similar lines going vertically....Depicting rule of third.
now when we see through the viewfinder we can approximate whatever is 1/3rd distance as we read from whatever is present on the line that is lowest ...see guys three horizontal lines would divide the frame into 3 parts and any subject on lower third of the line tells you you are 1/3rd into the scene at that focal length and aperture...so focus on a particular object that is lying on the lower third line passing and thats the approx hyperfocal distance. you can use live veiw as well to focus on this and magnify to accurately focus. ..than lock the focus...reframe the shot...and it might appear in the viewfinder that infinity or midground is not sharp but when you click the pic and zoom you will be jumping with what you got....But most useful tip Please shoot on a tripod and once focussed on that last grid line running horizontally...fix tripod sternly after refarming the shot so that there is no shake...so this is how you do it...now Enjoy fellaws...I have revealed you what took me 1 year to understand...its simple yet difficult to make sense of ...if you donot think over....Enjoy and Cheers

Offline kaushik_s

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Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #27 on: April 29, 2014, 06:19:31 PM »
Atul, usage of grid-lines has been a pretty well known trick from a long time. Canon guys have to use the Live view or replace the focusing screen with grid-line focusing screen (Ef-D).. But again, it gives you a approximation not the exact hyperfocal distance. But it also works as the hyperfocal distance lies somewhere near that (but not always).
Anyway, nowadays you can anyway use one of those android/iphone apps to find out the hyperfocal distance. Only caveat is that your lens must have the distance scale atleast.
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Offline Jasii

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Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #28 on: April 29, 2014, 06:21:27 PM »
Cheers and a clap your way kaushik ji and Atul ji.....  :)

Ps. Live-view on my canon has grid lines, need not shift to Nikon ;)
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Offline sehgalatul

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Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #29 on: April 29, 2014, 06:43:21 PM »
 Kaushik Sir...WHATEVER I HAVE MENTIONED IS AN APPROX WORKUP AS MOST OF THE TIME YOU WILL BE IN A SITUATION WHEREBY IF YOU DONT HAVE GLASSES WITH HYPERFOCAL DISTANCE ON THEM AND YOU HAVE CURRENT TYPE OF LENSES YOU HAVE TO USE THIS METHOD...uSING EXACT HYPERFOCAL DISTANCE IS NOT PRACTICAL IN MANY A SITUATIONS...yES YOU ARE RIGHT AS I HAVE SAID ITS APPROX HYPERFOCAL POINT BY THIS WAY....bUT WHAT I WAS ASKING EVERYONE WAS WHEN YOU SEE THROUGH A VIEWFINDER HOW DO YOU ESTIMATE AND POINT AT 1/3 OF THE SCENE. I HAVE GIVEN ANSWER FOR THAT...I BET 99.9 % PEOPLE JUST USE GRIDS FOR COMPOSITIONS BUT THE GRID HAS THIS BIGGEST ADVANTAGE THAT NO ONE USES AND TAKES GUESSWORK OUT OF YOUR PICTURES REGARDING ACHIEVING ACCEPTABLY SHARP PICTURES.

As you are well aware hyperfocal distance defination mentions claerly that its approximately the distance where you focus and scene one half in front of the point of focus to infinity is in accetably sharp focus.... I have simplified the chaet code but just highlighting that use the lowest of the grid line and focus on it...it takes you exactly into 1/3rd of the scene what you see in the viewfinder and takes guess work out where to focus. :)