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Author Topic: Shooting the Milky Way  (Read 5393 times)

Offline Jasii

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Re: Shooting the Milky Way
« Reply #15 on: April 02, 2014, 01:15:32 PM »
Hi Guys...Its great Reading your Chit Chat...Nice piece of Information gathered for all new bees..Very True. I would like to emphasize Very few Very Important Points. Firstly Timing and planning are very Important If you wish keepers in Astro work. If i have to go  Milky Way I will prefer to see Moon phase first...I will prefer and time when it is cresent or between cresent and new moon ...nether full moon nor full moon. Why not new moon is because you have to bump iso to exorbitant levels and grain and noise are always there...you have to Post process it markedly...Even Full frames start showing noise on new moon. Why Cresent is because moon has very less luminosity that aids you in shooting at relatively lower iso( you might get a same shot what you took at 3200/6400 on new moon at say 2000 or little less because of slight aid you get from moon. This difference will markedly improve pic quality and put you to less time on Computers. Point is Emphasis on timing and Planning. Do search for moon phases and luminosity charts before visits and never forget to check moon rise and moonset timings as well if you wish to scout to a location far away and come with handful of keepers.
Cheers...


Hi Doc Atul, Good to see your inaugral post, Hope to see you posting on a regular basis.

Cheers!

Ps. Your welcome thread is here:
http://photographyclubofindia.com/boards/index.php?topic=1375.0
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Offline sehgalatul

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Re: Shooting the Milky Way
« Reply #16 on: April 05, 2014, 07:55:54 AM »
Dear All,
              Just felt like sharing a secret with you...this pertains to all types of nightscapes irrespective of the fact whether it is shooting Milky way or Landscapes. many of you would agree with me that you guys make all the more efforts daring out at remote places..or away from Towns for night photography...Take a picture feel delighted after seeing at the back of Lcd...and come back home. Needless to say you dont have patience and sit immediately on your Laptops and Desktops to see and ;process the Image for sharing your work......I am 100% correct till this.... ;) all of you agree  as i Do the same.

But i have learnt something that i do differently from Many of you.........THATS THE SECRET....what makes me little more happy than many of you.  Once you are back and see the pic on Laptop/ Desktop you find what looked great on Lcd looks Underexposed on Screen and you feel you would have needed little long exposure. I want to emphasise something if you over expose a night scape you never lose anything...If you underexpose it no matter what software you will use to recover the details there is lot of noise in the dark areas. so Tip one dont feel bad if shot is over...you can compensate the same. But most Secret Formula to Avoid disappointments and to have a bang on exposure at anytime anywhere during Night time is to see the HISTOGRAM...iF it suggests that exposure is Correct you are there if it is towards RIght you have overexposed the image irrespective of what you see at back...if it is towards left ..image might appear superb but than once see it on big screen you realise it is under exposed. So studying Histogram is very Important...what appears bright and well exposed to our eyes at back Of our LCD is because of night adaptation of our eyes  and relative brightness of camera LCD... You can be fooled easily that you have banged it while you realise later that it got underexposed...SO SECRET FOR NIGHT WORK IS FOR BANG ON EXPOSURES AND LEAST POSTPROCESSING...DO STUDY HISTOGRAMS AND GET RESULTS RIGHT WITHIN CAMERA ITSELF...BE A PURIST...
Hope you all find this information useful.....Cant sAY CHEERS...ITS NAVRATRAS....

Offline Fake ID

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Re: Shooting the Milky Way
« Reply #17 on: April 05, 2014, 09:18:47 AM »
hi,

Some more info here for all of you.

Spectacular 32 pics of March 2014, of the Milky Way, Nebula , Orions etc.

http://www.space.com/24906-night-sky-photos-march-2014-stargazing-gallery.html

thanks for reading.

Anil George
« Last Edit: April 05, 2014, 09:24:49 AM by apacheebest »
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Offline aditya95krishna

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Re: Shooting the Milky Way
« Reply #18 on: October 17, 2016, 08:00:26 PM »
hey i have a lg g4 with about shutten speed of 30 seconds and also pretty much other manual controls of a dslr, wanted to know if I can shoot the milky way in oct end '16 with this camera

Offline LightWave

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Re: Shooting the Milky Way
« Reply #19 on: October 17, 2016, 10:13:46 PM »
hey i have a lg g4 with about shutten speed of 30 seconds and also pretty much other manual controls of a dslr, wanted to know if I can shoot the milky way in oct end '16 with this camera

No harm trying. You will need a stand to hold the camera. Also what is the aperture of the camera? Results likely to be suboptimal due to high ISOs which are often needed.