Author Topic: Some landscapes from Panchgani  (Read 312 times)

Offline bitublack

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Some landscapes from Panchgani
« on: December 31, 2018, 01:50:23 AM »
C&C is welcome :) .




Offline Hankosaurus

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Re: Some landscapes from Panchgani
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2019, 06:33:59 AM »
Hi Abhishek.

Because of the low key lighting, and my predisposition to think of these images as having been taken at or near dusk, these images convey a sense of foreboding to me.  A sort of sadness, the end of light.  Were these images taken at first light, or at dusk? 

I suppose that if my mind saw them as first light, I might have an impression of the end of night, the coming of a bright new day.  And that would have been more like hope than foreboding.

Interesting how our own interpretation can govern how an image affects us. 

What message did you have in mind for each? 
Henry
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Some say that those of us who like to talk about cameras should instead go and take pictures. I say we should go and also take pictures.

Offline bitublack

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Re: Some landscapes from Panchgani
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2019, 05:25:50 PM »
Hi Abhishek.

Because of the low key lighting, and my predisposition to think of these images as having been taken at or near dusk, these images convey a sense of foreboding to me.  A sort of sadness, the end of light.  Were these images taken at first light, or at dusk? 

I suppose that if my mind saw them as first light, I might have an impression of the end of night, the coming of a bright new day.  And that would have been more like hope than foreboding.

Interesting how our own interpretation can govern how an image affects us. 

What message did you have in mind for each?

The first one was taken at dusk, and the second one early in the morning.

You bring up interesting points about the image messages. The same image being able to convey different moods depending on when one thinks they were taken.

For the first (dusk) shot, I took an unusually long exposure (about 60s) to see if I could make the water look glassy/artificial and catch some motion on the clouds (as seen in the image, it didn't work out). For landscapes, I try to pause and take in the scenery, and try to 'listen' for the first few words that jump to my head, and then take the shot in a way that accentuates those words. Being a dusk shot, the words I came up with were very similar to the ones that you thought of. I was thinking 'end', 'change', 'fade away' and similar slightly dark negative thoughts. 'Cold' and 'windy' also came up, but I could not find a way to portray it in this shot, and did not have time for another shot through which I could portray cold and windy.

On the other hand, for the second (dawn) shot, I was thinking 'isolation', 'marooned', 'hope' (suggested by the first rays of light that had just started catching the terrain). So it was a mixture of negative foreboding thoughts competing with the positivity due to the first rays of light.

Your comment is very interesting. I am always attracted to great looking light (be it because of interesting patterns, high contrast, low/negligible contrast) and I think of these as interesting shot opportunities. From your comment, I realize that being able to listen in to the conflicts in my own mind can also help create great images (like hope and isolation at the same time in the second shot). I also realize that just taking away some context (like trying to forget whether it is dawn/dusk) while visualizing a shot can also create great opportunities to portray things in a non-obvious way. Its almost like a variation of abstract shots, but the abstractness is confined to the feeling/mood, not the visual aspects of the shot.

Thank you for this comment and your views. I really appreciate it.