Hello Guest

Author Topic: Develop film using Lego Mindstorm  (Read 1084 times)

Offline madsolute

  • Regular
  • *
  • Posts: 78
Develop film using Lego Mindstorm
« on: January 22, 2014, 09:42:25 AM »
Something interesting for DIY junkies!

Got this link on twitter and had a look jst out of curiosity...

Have never developed film myself but shot some stuff on film..

Keen to know what folks have to say about this... Feel free to share some more interesting stuff on this

http://www.diyphotography.net/how-develop-film-lego-mindstorms?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Diyphotographynet+%28DIYPhotography.net+-+Photography+and+Studio+Lighting%29


Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

Offline Hankosaurus

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero
  • *
  • Posts: 589
Re: Develop film using Lego Mindstorm
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2014, 10:27:35 AM »
Hi madsolute!

Thanks for the link. I am a DIY tinkerer myself, continually being amused with some or another aspect of physics, electronics, photography, and such. So, naturally, I bookmarked the home page of DIYPhotography.net after looking at the LEGO film development system you referenced above.

I had a black and white and color darkroom for many years, but I never developed film with a machine. So, everything was manual in operation.  While automatic processes have advantages such as consistency and perfect timing and sequencing, they may have limitations too.

I reflect upon some of the things I did, and which I wonder how a machine could approximate them. For example, I used to invert and rotate the film tank as I turned it during development. I remember tapping the tank against the work surface to cause bubbles to dislodge from the film (to prevent the appearance of pinholes in the film). I guess there are automatic procedures to address such things, but I am left in wonderment of whatever they are.

I like the idea of the beverage heater for temperature stabilization.  It set my mind to turning about how one might take a thermistor, a comparator, and that heater to hold water at a precise temperature.  In my darkroom this was accomplished with thermostatically controlled mixing valves, blending water from a hot and a cold water line.

Thanks for sharing and for stirring up all those old memories too.

:)
Henry
A Certified Dinosaur
D700, F, F2, M3

Some say that those of us who like to talk about cameras should instead go and take pictures. I say we should go and also take pictures.