Author Topic: Few photography tips (mostly applicable for street/people photography)  (Read 1308 times)

Offline itsme_soumya

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some very interesting points worth sharing..

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1. Get in close

It was the famous photojournalist Robert Capa who once said ?If your photographs aren?t good enough, you?re not close enough.? He was talking about getting in amongst the action. If you feel like your images aren?t ?popping?, take a step or two closer to your subject. Fill the frame with your subject and see how much better your photo will look without so much wasted space. The closer you are to the subject, the better you can see their facial expressions too.

4. Ask permission

When photographing people, especially while in countries with different cultures and languages, it can be hard to communicate. In certain countries if you photograph someone you are not ?supposed? to photograph, it can get ugly and rough very quickly if you are not careful. So out of respect you should always ask permission. I have started shooting a series of school children in Pakistan. These are all posed portraits and they are looking down the lens. My guide helps me with the language and I limit myself to smiling, shaking hands, giving ?hi-five? and showing them the image on the back of my camera once it is done. You would be amazed how quickly people open up. ? Andrea Francolini

11. Slow down

Take time to think about what is going on in the viewfinder before pressing the shutter. How are you going to compose the shot? How are you going to light it? Don?t jump straight in without giving it some thought first. ? Brad Marsellos

12. Stop chimping (checking the photo on the back screen)

It?s a bad habit digital photographers can develop. Time and time again I see photographers take a photograph and then look at the back of the screen straight away. By doing that you could miss all the special moments. You can look at your photos later. You can miss ?the shot? and it affects the flow of your work, so just keep shooting! ? Marina Dot Perkins

16. Be present

This means make eye-contact, engage and listen to your subject. With the eyes ? lower that camera and be human. Bring the camera up for a decisive shot. But remember to lower it, like you?re coming up for air, to check in with your subject. Don?t treat them like a science experiment under a microscope. Being there with your subject shows them respect, levels the playing field in terms of power dynamics, and calms them down. You?ll get much more natural images this way. ? Heather Faulkner

21. Shoot with your mind

Even when you?re not shooting, shoot with your mind. Practice noticing expressions and light conditions. Work out how you?d compose a picture of that scene over there that interests you, and what sort of exposure you might use to capture it best. ? Leah Robertson

22. Return the favor

Always remember that if you are shooting people in a different country, they are probably doing you a favor by posing. So the least you can do is return this favor some way or another.

I often return to the same places year after year, so I bring along prints and look for the people I photographed previously. In some areas people do not have a picture of themselves. Imagine not having a picture of you and your family? Strange don?t you think? Yet many people don?t. So a $0.50 print can really make someone happy. It also opens doors for more photography further down the track. ? Andrea Francolini

25. Keep it simple

Don?t try to pack too many elements into your image; it will just end up looking messy. If you just include one or two points of interest, your audience won?t be confused at where they should be looking or what they should be looking at.

26. Don?t get bogged down by equipment

We?ve all seen these types of photographers out and about. They usually have three or four different cameras strapped around their necks with lenses long enough for an African safari. In reality, there?s probably no need for all that equipment. One body with one or two lenses means that you?ll be freer in your movements to capture interesting angles or subjects on the move.

28. Be aware of backgrounds

What?s in your frame? So often I see great photos and think ?didn?t they see that garbage bin, ugly wall, sign, etc?? It?s not just the person or object in your frame, it?s everything else in the background that can make or break a great photograph. So don?t be afraid to ask the person to move (or move yourself) to avoid something ugly in the background. ? Marina Dot Perkins

32. Don?t spend too much time post-processing

The key is to get it right in the camera first, so you don?t HAVE to spend time editing. Over working a photo in editing software very rarely looks good, unless you are trying to achieve a super-artsy effect. If it takes you longer than ten minutes to alter your photo, maybe think about going back out into the field to re-shoot it.

33. Variation

Variation is key. I often use a recipe from Life Magazine picture editors for building a story narrative. I look for: over-all shots or scene-setters, interaction, action, portraits, details, medium shots and of course the signature image. Having this list in my head helps me start photographing a story that sometimes isn?t visually apparent until you get into it. This is great when you?re in a crowded or busy place. ? Heather Faulkner

36. Limit your palette

When photos have too many colours spewing out from them, they?re often hard to look at. Unless it?s a photo of a rainbow or the Mardi Gras. Try to focus on having one or two colours predominately featuring in your photograph. It will be more pleasing to the eye and will help set the tone of the image.

37. Get your subject to relax

This applies mostly to portrait style photography. As a press photographer, I spend most of my time doing one on one portrait shoots. I think it?s really beneficial to take the time (if you have it) talking to your subject, asking questions, showing an interest in whatever it is they do. I find it really helpful in relaxing the person and often they?ll say something and that can lead to a better photo opportunity. ? Marina Dot Perkins

full list is available at: http://petapixel.com/2014/01/24/40-tips-take-better-photos/?utm_medium=referral&utm_source=pulsenews
To me, photography is the simultaneous recognition, in a fraction of a second, of the significance of an event. ~ Henri Cartier-Bresson

Offline theqca

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Re: Few photography tips (mostly applicable for street/people photography)
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2014, 03:15:20 PM »
Thanks for the tips.. I'm keen on giving street photography a try one of these days and these make interesting reading... Trying to connect these with what I have in mind preferably somewhere in a rural environment.
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Offline DG

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Re: Few photography tips (mostly applicable for street/people photography)
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2014, 04:42:38 PM »
some very interesting points worth sharing..

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In some areas people do not have a picture of themselves. Imagine not having a picture of you and your family? Strange don?t you think? Yet many people don?t. So a $0.50 print can really make someone happy. It also opens doors for more photography further down the track. ? Andrea Francolini

I can connect to this. I went to Bikaner where I wanted to shoot some women....I asked permission and they were very happy....but after taking their shots, when I showed them, they were politely asking me for their photographs to keep it with them or to take it to home....I was helpless...forget studio there were not even a cyber cafe present. I asked if they can give any email id (I was so fool), they were rural women and illiterate, couldnt properly tell their house address as well !!!...Next day I was leaving and flight was scheduled from Jaipur. They told me, they do not have a single photographs...never had any...even never saw their own...I was so depressed and sad that day by wondering here we are changing our profile pic everyday in facebook but I am unable meet a small request from these innocent girls and women......I was deeply moved...this also happens in India...not a decade back...just 3 months back!!!   

« Last Edit: February 19, 2014, 04:45:49 PM by DG »
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Offline Subhadip

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Re: Few photography tips (mostly applicable for street/people photography)
« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2014, 12:58:09 PM »
Thanks Soumya for sharing.. Will also request ( i know its too much) that you can do a small live sessions since we would like to see the action point before venturing out...
Mad about Nikon... :)

Offline Madhav Bhakta

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Re: Few photography tips (mostly applicable for street/people photography)
« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2014, 02:47:13 PM »
Thanks for sharing Soumya.
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Offline Jasii

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Re: Few photography tips (mostly applicable for street/people photography)
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2014, 10:43:35 AM »
Great set of tips Soumya ji!

Rgds,
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Offline nitusharma

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Re: Few photography tips (mostly applicable for street/people photography)
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2019, 10:42:33 PM »
Thanks for the tips. I am a destination wedding photographer in Delhi. These tips really help me a lot in improving my photography skills.