Author Topic: Garland of bokeh - first try of abstract photography  (Read 1493 times)

Offline shooter

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Garland of bokeh - first try of abstract photography
« on: January 20, 2014, 11:59:07 PM »
Used Nikon D5000, Kit lens, no PP. Please critique....




« Last Edit: January 21, 2014, 12:00:39 AM by shooter »

Offline Hankosaurus

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Re: Garland of bokeh - first try of abstract photography
« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2014, 12:23:12 AM »
Hi shooter.

I have a soft spot for abstractions too.  Looks like you are having fun.

The mysterious human component is interesting to me. Sort of causes the viewer to do a "double take". I feel that any image that causes the viewer to look at it twice has something good going for it.

The soft, out of focus elements are sensitive to the space and frame. I feel a bit of tension tugging from lower left to upper right, maybe because it is a bit difficult to find a rhythm, commanding point of focus, or an obvious pattern or harmony or some such in the display.  I think I would like to see a little more excitement such as comes from the colorful disks.

What was the occasion?

:)
« Last Edit: January 21, 2014, 02:58:03 AM by Hankosaurus »
Henry
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D700, F, F2, M3

Some say that those of us who like to talk about cameras should instead go and take pictures. I say we should go and also take pictures.

Offline shooter

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Re: Garland of bokeh - first try of abstract photography
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2014, 02:48:38 PM »
Hi, Henry...Thanks for the amount of time you spent to analyze the picture. I was looking to do something, beyond the usual methods and techniques of abstract photography. Most of the photographs i have seen, contains a very high magnified image, filling the screen, such as a ball from the ball point pen, or random electronic parts, or some superimposition (combining 2 or more images to get a new one), some light trails, but all seem to focus at something, though they use very shallow DOF most of the times. While shooting in the streets at night, I casually came up with the idea of making the street completely out of focus, and freezing the lights as bokehs, in a single frame. From the next time, I will like to improve what I thing from the thing you said. Thank you  :D